DESIGN FOR AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT 2050

"There's a way to do it better - find it." -Thomas Edison

 
 Peter B. Lewis Building, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio USA

Peter B. Lewis Building, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio USA

weatherhead dm management fellowships

Pamela Robinson holds the distinction of being a Doctorate of Management (DM) Management Design and Innovation Fellow, Fowler Center Sustainability Fellow and Non-Profit Management Fellow.

She examines problems of design and the innovative practice of creating and imagining alternative futures in the context of managerial action;

related to the management of sustainable enterprises; and

the development of non-profit and public sector.

Pamela's design interest was inspired by Frank Gehry's design process of the Peter B. Lewis Building and the economic impact of the Guggenheim Museum for the city of Bilboa Spain.


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THE ROLE OF POSITIVE DEVIANCE IN AGRIBUSINESS Sustainability

Agribusiness managers are faced with opportunities to design agribusiness multi-stakeholder sustainability strategies that tackle the agriculture sector’s transformational challenges through 2050. Given the new realities that have emerged in the past decades and that continue to intensify today, the classic scientific approach to management is an inadequate approach in the social complexity of agribusiness management. More pressing, the global agricultural sector is facing transformational challenges to double production to nourish a growing population of 9 billion people in 2050 and 11 billion people in 2100. Most of the population growth will stem from developing countries. Subsequently, 80% of the developing countries make a living from agriculture. I believe the stakeholders in the developing counties are vital to the design of sustainability strategies and must be engaged in the design process. The agricultural sector is faced with not only oncoming population growth, but meeting consumer demands for access to quality food, transparency to show ingredients in non-local foods, responding to climate changes, and on a global scale eradicating hunger under 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. I believe if the global agribusiness stakeholders true aim is towards sustainable development, then agribusiness management fundamentals must be revitalized, assumptions challenged and the multiple stakeholder value chain re-imagined.  

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 Inside Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao Spain

Inside Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao Spain


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SUSTAINABILITY DEVELOPMENT GOALS

The agribusiness sector is in the early stages of transformation. Public-Private-Producer Partnership (4P) is seen as an innovative approach to address the multifaceted challenges in agriculture beyond production. Pamela believes design attitude and thinking may help shape the global agribusiness Public-Private-Producer Partnership value chain.

agribusiness MANAGEMENT 2050

Agribusiness managers face daunting tasks to tackle the agriculture sector’s transformational challenges. If the global agribusiness stakeholders’ true aim is towards sustainable development, then agribusiness management fundamentals must be revitalized, assumptions challenged and the multiple stakeholder value chain reimagined. Coming from a position of collective strengths aimed at positive impact of economic, social and environmental sustainability, multiple stakeholders can shape Agribusiness Management 2050 into what can be.

~Pamela S. Robinson

"If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." -African Proverb

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2,000 year old rice terraces of banaue - Philippines

 

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agribusiness sustainable development

As the private enterprise working in partnership with public entities and the producers, within 15 months this Senegal village doubled their revenue, expanded with now 120 businesses to the coop, became profitable with cash in the bank, used profits to buy sheep and add two additional revenue generating activities to their offerings, built a permanent storage building to store products due to their growth. They now have financial books and internal controls in place. In addition, the leaders in the agri-coop set up accounts to address social issues in the community. Finally, the collective agri-coop is protecting the environment by using only organic materials for planting and natural ingredients in their soap making activities.

TTT Senegal

Agribusiness train-the-trainer program

Following positive impact success in agribusiness financial management training, I designed agribusiness train-the-trainer programs which are impacting over 90 villages and thousands of people’s livelihoods.